Category Archives: Stories

Finders Keepers

So what have you found it the back of your taxi recently, what the most expensive, ludicrous, odd, or just plain weird object, post comments here by clicking on the comments button.

An interesting article published by inquirer stated that “A SURVEY OF taxi drivers showed that people are losing their mobile phones, their PDAs, their notebooks, and even their lives in the back of cabs, worldwide.

According to Pointsec, which surveyed 900 licensed cabbies in London, Sydney, Paris, Munich, Oslo, Helsinki, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Chicago, one driver turned round to find his passenger dead.

Other cabbies have found passengers’ false teeth and their artificial limbs in the back of their vehicles.

The firm claimed that Jemima Khan left her iPod and mobile phone in a black cab, but the cabbie called her friend, who turned out to be someone called Hugh Grant.

The survey claimed to show that in the last six months, drivers of London’s black cab unearthed 63,135 mobile phones, 5,838 Pocket PCs, and 4,973 notebooks.

The London survey was conducted by the Licensed Taxi Drivers Association, Taxi. But Pointsec claimed that an average of 80% of passengers were re-united with their mobiles after the cabbies tracked down their owners.”

Finders Keepers

So what have you found it the back of your taxi recently, what the most expensive, ludicrous, odd, or just plain weird object, post comments here by clicking on the comments button.

An interesting article published by inquirer stated that “A SURVEY OF taxi drivers showed that people are losing their mobile phones, their PDAs, their notebooks, and even their lives in the back of cabs, worldwide.

According to Pointsec, which surveyed 900 licensed cabbies in London, Sydney, Paris, Munich, Oslo, Helsinki, Stockholm, Copenhagen and Chicago, one driver turned round to find his passenger dead.

Other cabbies have found passengers’ false teeth and their artificial limbs in the back of their vehicles.

The firm claimed that Jemima Khan left her iPod and mobile phone in a black cab, but the cabbie called her friend, who turned out to be someone called Hugh Grant.

The survey claimed to show that in the last six months, drivers of London’s black cab unearthed 63,135 mobile phones, 5,838 Pocket PCs, and 4,973 notebooks.

The London survey was conducted by the Licensed Taxi Drivers Association, Taxi. But Pointsec claimed that an average of 80% of passengers were re-united with their mobiles after the cabbies tracked down their owners.”

Finders Keepers

So have you ever had any famous passengers in the back of you Taxi? Post your story here.

A History Lesson

London�s black cabs are an inseparable part of the city. So much so that these taxis have attained a legendary stature hardly paralleled anywhere else in the world. Modernization, however, has seen to it that not all the black cabs in greater London remain black; a trendy, streamlined version has now replaced some of the old ones.

Ever since the days of horse drawn carriages, the specifications of London’s taxis have been regulated. In 1679, passenger safety concerns resulted in the development of Conditions of Fitness. These requirements, modified as and when necessary, are still strictly enforced by the Public Carriage Office, a division of the Metropolitan Police. The London taxi which lingers in most people�s memories is the Austin FX-4, which was introduced in 1959 and remained in production until 1997.

A London taxi is subject to thorough periodic inspections and is retired after 10 to 12 years and thousands of miles of service. When retired, many of them move away to other cities where rules are less stringent. Some are dismantled and their parts sold off. A collector feels proud if he does have a London taxi in his collection. “The Knowledge” test Membership of the team of London�s black cab drivers does not come easy.

Drivers have to get through a tough test known as �The Knowledge� before earning the right to sit behind the wheel. They have to memorize almost every road near central London and also be familiar with the location of every hospital, theatre, train station, hotel etc. Finally, they undergo months of tough tests before being eligible for the certificate.

A History Lesson

London’s black cabs are an inseparable part of the city. So much so that these taxis have attained a legendary stature hardly paralleled anywhere else in the world. Modernization, however, has seen to it that not all the black cabs in greater London remain black; a trendy, streamlined version has now replaced some of the old ones.

Ever since the days of horse drawn carriages, the specifications of London’s taxis have been regulated. In 1679, passenger safety concerns resulted in the development of Conditions of Fitness. These requirements, modified as and when necessary, are still strictly enforced by the Public Carriage Office, a division of the Metropolitan Police. The London taxi which lingers in most people’s memories is the Austin FX-4, which was introduced in 1959 and remained in production until 1997.

A London taxi is subject to thorough periodic inspections and is retired after 10 to 12 years and thousands of miles of service. When retired, many of them move away to other cities where rules are less stringent. Some are dismantled and their parts sold off. A collector feels proud if he does have a London taxi in his collection. “The Knowledge” test Membership of the team of London’s black cab drivers does not come easy.

Drivers have to get through a tough test known as “The Knowledge” before earning the right to sit behind the wheel. They have to memorize almost every road near central London and also be familiar with the location of every hospital, theatre, train station, hotel etc. Finally, they undergo months of tough tests before being eligible for the certificate.

A History Lesson

London’s black cabs are an inseparable part of the city. So much so that these taxis have attained a legendary stature hardly paralleled anywhere else in the world. Modernization, however, has seen to it that not all the black cabs in greater London remain black; a trendy, streamlined version has now replaced some of the old ones.

Ever since the days of horse drawn carriages, the specifications of London’s taxis have been regulated. In 1679, passenger safety concerns resulted in the development of Conditions of Fitness. These requirements, modified as and when necessary, are still strictly enforced by the Public Carriage Office, a division of the Metropolitan Police. The London taxi which lingers in most people’s memories is the Austin FX-4, which was introduced in 1959 and remained in production until 1997.

A London taxi is subject to thorough periodic inspections and is retired after 10 to 12 years and thousands of miles of service. When retired, many of them move away to other cities where rules are less stringent. Some are dismantled and their parts sold off. A collector feels proud if he does have a London taxi in his collection. “The Knowledge” test Membership of the team of London’s black cab drivers does not come easy.

Drivers have to get through a tough test known as “The Knowledge” before earning the right to sit behind the wheel. They have to memorize almost every road near central London and also be familiar with the location of every hospital, theatre, train station, hotel etc. Finally, they undergo months of tough tests before being eligible for the certificate.